Tagged: CoverTime

CoverTime: may the cubane be with you

Another beautiful cover (frontispiece) from Angewandte Chemie….. And another proof (if you really need more) that chemists are huge nerds….

anie201681161-toc-0001-mThis time is a beautiful homage to the last Star Wars movie…… No, not talking about Jar Jar… and not even about a new fluorescent detectors for Midi-chlorians. Force sensors? Not even close…
But let’s go with some order:
I don’t know if you paid attention to it, but there are 25 authors on this paper… 26…. This should already give you the complexity of the research done in there…. 26….
7 Students
9 Doctors
10 Professors
Simply impressive, but in such huge work I would like they use the style of Natures where at the end of the paper there is also the “Author contributions”.

EDIT: Thanks to the power of internet, the firs author of the paper pointed out that the “author contribution” was under my eyes all the time in the supplementary information… So here we go (and again, pretty impressive):

Author Contributions: C.M.W., G.P.S. and J.T. conceived the project. C.M.W., B.A.C., H.X. and S.D.H. chose the cubane targets. B.A.C., H.X. and S.D.H. undertook the synthetic preparation of all cubane analogues and obtained the respective characterisation data. C.M.W. and B.A.C. wrote the paper with assistance from all authors. C.E.J.C. and H.M.C. designed the leteprinim study and analysed results. S.G. and M.T.S undertook the Phase I and II leteprinim metabolism study and analysed the results. A.K. and M.T.S. designed the benzocaine study and analysed results. B.C., A.R., D.W., and S.K.N. designed the SAHA mouse study and analysed results. C.-E.M. and G.H.W. designed the diflubenzuron study and analysed results. J.S. and J.D.V. designed the t-butylbenzene metabolism study and analysed results. G.M.B., C.J.P., and P.G.P. designed the SAHA cell line study and analysed results. S.W.L. performed the LogP analysis. P.V.B. performed the X-ray crystallographic structure determination for compounds 4 and 12. C.P. and J.Mc. designed the scabies study and analysed results.

 

Anyway, cubanes. I have always loved the cubane synthesis, mainly because the cubane molecule is so nicely perfect. There are also some beautiful pieces on the cubane by Roald Hoffman “in praise of synthesis” and in his book “on the Philosophy, Art, and Science of Chemistry”. Such beautiful, yet complex to synthesize, molecules….

And that’s naturally not the first time, most probably not the last one, that Star Wars enters the world of chemistry….

The classical example is “A supramolecular Star Wars Tie Fighter Ship” where Star Wars is even in the title. And this figure in the paper is just pure bliss:

star wars chemistry

Fun with chemical structures as well here.

Tie Fighter

And what about you, poor trekkies???? Worry not, almost any smartphone based analysis is called tricorder nowadays…..

 

Other CoverTime: the power of the metal, Robots, 80s vs 90s.

CoverTime: Robots

How nerd are you? Can you identify the robot in this cover (without googling)?

tripod

 

Did you get it?

This is a cover from a review in ACIE from the group of Ley about machine assisted organic synthesis. I’m a big fan of Ley and all the automatic things and remote control they have in the lab, but we are here for one and only one reason: The cover!

So, which kind of robot they used for the cover?
I’m pretty sure it’s a badass tripod from the war of the worlds.

warofworldsaliens

Now, let’s forget for one moment that the size of the tripod is huuuuuuge, and I guess is not going to fit in the lab, but my main question is: Why picking up an “hostile” robot?
Frankly speaking, the tripod is not such friendly robot one would have around…. True, it has quite a lot of flexible arms that are handy, but still….

And then I was wondering, which robot I would like to have in the lab? And here the topic gets complicated…..

A random decepticon, although they are not friendly, I just love the metallic voice “DECEPTICON” from time to time.

c-3PO is kind of useless, but it’s nice for the fun and the good atmosphere of the lab.

R2-D2 it will be like that non-english speaking labmate that is impossible to understand, but he fixes the HPLC like no one else.

Ash/Bishop, shall I trust him? Is he going to scoop all my research and send it to someone else?

Data, amazing guy, he knows every-fucking-thing. Maybe little bit arrogant and I-know-it-all-guy, but well, he has his reasons.

Number 5, maybe it’s a good choice. Still I don’t like how he moves.

Robocop, booooooring.

Chappie, undergrads for few minutes, PhD in one day and then he will be the best chemist ever.

Terminator, “I’ll be back”, yes but when? Why did you leave all this mess in the lab? Where are you going? No, you cannot just add Sarah Connor as author in the paper.

HAL 9000, come on, please distill some DCM, is not that dangerous.

 

And then I stopped thinking about that, the choice is way too difficult to be solved in one day. And you, which robot would you like to have in the lab?

 

Previous CoverTime: The power of the Metal, 80s vs 90s.

CoverTime: The power of Metal

nanoscale

One of the most “metal” cover I’ve ever seen is coming from a Chinese group: Gong’s publication on ZnO “nanopencil” featured the cover of Nanoscale. Let’s forget for one moment about the nano-whatever word and focus on the beauty of the cover: Two metal missiles flying under a heavy storm.

Two songs come up in my mind watching this cover:

 

and I can only imagine the group working on this, singing along this song in the lab after getting the cover published:

“Brothers of metal
We are fighting with power and steel
Fighting for metal that’s all that’s real
Brothers of metal will always be there
Standing together with hands in the air”

 

 

CoverTime: 80s vs 90s

Let’s start a new category: It’s CoverTime!!!

The first topic of this category is ’80s versus ’90s……

He-Man was a chemistIn the beautiful cover for the last issue of ChemElectroChem the Spanish group headed by Ibon Odriozola decided to use He-Man (aka Violoman) as a powerful chemist. In the ’80s favorite cartoon Skeleton this time become Skelectrode. Kudos for the use of comic sans, this so many time abused font, here is used properly. What else should I say? FOR THE POWER OF GREYSKULL!!!!!!
I can see a small tear in your eye, chemists born in the ’80s…. Here you go: watch the trailer of the awful movie “Master of the Universe”:

Naturally all of you know that Dolph has a master degree in chemical engineering…..

 

Second cover of the day, and this time for the chemists born in the ’90s:

PoCheMon ChemistryThis cover of Chemistry A European Journal was designed by an Italian group headed by  Marcella Bonchio. Why using a poké ball for a chemistry cover? That’s because you didn’t know that pokemon is the acronym of POlyoxometalate CHEmistry for Molecular Nanoscience. How genius? Funny things is that there are waaaaay more than only 151 polyoxometalate…. Gotta catch’em all!!!!

As I’ve used a video for the ’80s I should use one for the ’90s as well….

and I’ll leave you with this image:

Pka

since now on, you will never manage to say pKa without thinking of Pika Pika Pilachu… You’re welcome :D